COVID-19 Update:

Dear Valued Patients,
We will be re-opening on May 18, 2020 to resume dental procedures.

In order to maintain the health, safety, and well being of our patients and staff we will be strictly following the most recent guidelines per the CDC and the Maryland Health Department.

If you are experiencing a dental concern that requires immediate attention,

please contact us on our emergency phone-in line at 410-472-3574.

 

For other questions or concerns and to schedule an appointment please call the office phone number at 410-933-1099. You may also contact us at [email protected] or use the contact us form at the bottom of this page.

 

We will continue to monitor current guidelines so that we may provide the best and safest dental care to our patients.


 

 

 

 Patient Feedback 

 

3 Ways Your Dental Hygienist Improves Your Oral Health
By John Kelmenson, D.D.S.
April 06, 2020
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral hygiene  
3WaysYourDentalHygienistImprovesYourOralHealth

You may think an office cleaning is mainly cosmetic — giving your teeth that polished look and you that pleasant, “squeaky clean” feeling. But your dental hygienist is doing more than making your teeth look great during your cleaning session — they’re also providing a valuable service keeping your teeth and gums healthy.

Here, then, are 3 things your dental hygienist is doing during a cleaning session that protects your health.

Removing disease-causing plaque. An office cleaning produces more than a fresh and clean smile. Your hygienist is manually removing plaque and calculus (hardened plaque deposits) in hard to reach places or where it has built up despite your best efforts at brushing and flossing. This built-up plaque is a ready source of bacteria producing acids, which give rise to both tooth decay and gum disease. And for actual occurrences of the latter, plaque removal is an important part of the treatment to restore your gums to a healthy pink.

Checking for signs of dental disease. As your hygienist cleans your teeth, they’re also looking for abnormalities in the mouth’s soft tissue — lumps, bumps, sores, or swelling — that may indicate something more serious requiring further examination. They’re also assessing your overall gum health, probing any areas that might indicate gum disease. And, of course, they’re looking for cavities, softened enamel or other signs of tooth decay.

Helping you improve your oral hygiene. As proficient as they are, a dental hygienist can only do so much to help prevent dental disease; the rest — daily brushing and flossing — is on your shoulders. But you’re not completely on your own, because your hygienist is your best personal hygiene training partner: not only can they assess how well you’re doing in your daily regimen, but they can also give you expert advice and tips on improving your brushing and flossing performance.

If you would like more information on the role of your hygienist in your dental care, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Dental Hygiene Visit.”

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